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Articles Archive for October 2008

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[25 Oct 2008 | Comments Off on Red Fox’s man in the shadows | 227,853 views ]

THE date was Thursday, March 21, 1963. The time was just after midnight. The instigator of action was the famous political reporter Alan “The Red Fox” Reid, a loyal employee of anti-Labor media mogul Frank Packer.
The locale was the Hotel Kingston in Canberra, where a special conference of the Australian Labor Party had been convened to decide whether the party should endorse a new US communications base in Western Australia.
For weeks Reid had been writing articles in the Packer press (notably The Daily Telegraph, which much later was sold …

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[24 Oct 2008 | One Comment | 1,031 views ]

It’s worth remembering that Australia’s only coup d’état took place in Sydney at a time when alcohol was widely used as a currency in the fledgling colony of New South Wales.
On 26 January 1808, Governor William Bligh (of the mutiny on the Bounty fame) was forcibly deposed by George Johnston, Commander of the New South Wales Corps. Johnston led 400 armed soldiers — many of them young — up Bridge Street, Sydney to take Bligh prisoner in what soon became known as ‘The Rum Rebellion’. This was because control over …

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[20 Oct 2008 | Comments Off on Sunshine state mergers has ALP on the run | 1,030 views ]

IT is rare for a political party to achieve a 10 per cent turnaround in the opinion polls in just six months. But this is what has happened in Queensland, where that state’s newly merged Liberal-National Party, the LNP, has injected new life into conservative politics.
This is why, on one hand, the 10-year-old state Labor Government is becoming nervous, while on the other Malcolm Turnbull – aware of the role Queensland must play if he is to become prime minister – is effusive in his praise for the LNP. Indeed, …

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[6 Oct 2008 | Comments Off on Pensioners on the bread line | 1,164 views ]

THE sign of a civilised society is how its government looks after the marginalised, needy and impoverished.
By any meaningful definition, many Australian pensioners are living below the poverty line. Yet unless political pressure is brought to bear, our pensioners don’t look like getting a much-needed pay rise any time soon.
The changing of the guard in the federal Opposition allows for the possibility of Malcolm Turnbull and his Coalition taking a principled stand and, in so doing, embarrassing the Labor troika of Kevin Rudd, Wayne Swan and Julia Gillard.
Opportunistically, but …